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FEM machining simulation

 

FEM machining simulation - AdvantEdge examples

 

In the current work, the main goal is to make a prediction of the influence of the friction coefficient when machining an AISI 1045 steel. An experimental validation of the process was also conducted in order to meet the results found when machining the steel with commercial finite element software. The comparison shows that the friction modeling at the tool-chip interface has a significant influence in the final results. Additional studies could also be obtained from the simulation like cutting forces, temperature, plastic strain and plastic strain rate. Therefore, the objective of this work is to address the friction value in the tool-chip interface and its influence in the simulated results. From the simulations and experimental work (in orthogonal cut), it can be concluded that the friction coefficient is crucial to obtain valuable predictions when machining with the FEM model.

 

Figure 1: Simulated forces and temperature for the orthogonal cut of AISI 1045 along the depth of cut. Cutting speed was 100 m/min with a feed of 0.1 mm/rev and a depth of cut of 2.5 mm 

Figure 2: Comparison between experimentation and simulation (with a friction coefficient of 0.44) for the cutting temperature for the orthogonal cut of AISI 1045. The cutting speed was 100 m/min with a feed of 0.1 mm/rev and a depth of cut of 2.5 mm

Figure 3: Temperature distribution at the end of the length of cut in the tool, workpiece, chip and burr

Figure 4: Comparison between experimentation and simulation (with a friction coefficient of 0.44) for the plastic strain for the orthogonal cut of AISI 1045. The cutting speed was 100 m/min with a feed of 0.1 mm/rev and a depth of cut of 2.5 mm

Figure 5: Plastic strain distribution at the end of the length of cut in the tool, workpiece, chip and burr

 

Figure 6: Plastic strain rate distribution at the end of the length of cut in the tool, workpiece, chip and burr

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